(EP/Demo Roundup) KRYPT / TO THE DOGS / WHIPSTRIKER / ICE WAR reviews

Written by Jeff Tighe


The Mighty Decibel has a quick listen to some of the EPs out there in the land of extreme music. First up are Krypt, from Georgia, USA with their 5 song, 14 minute EP, Enter the Krypt. How these guys are unsigned is beyond me. This is pure thrash with shout-style vocals by guitarist Julian Chew that will get your head banging from the get-go. Any fan of Slayer, Destruction or Sodom will love this stuff. After repeated listens, my only response each time was, "Man, I wish this was a full album". These guys should have labels fighting to sign them. (9)


To the Dogs from Wisconsin, USA have put out a 3 song, 9 minute EP that sounds to these ears like the mighty Onslaught (Ed. early era). The emphasis here is on riffs that pulverize, with a minimum of guitar solo histrionics. The production is a bit muddy, but that simply isn't the point with this release. What is the point is speed, speed and more speed. Chris McMorrow's vocals have a black tinge that are not exactly original, but they aren't bad. A solid effort. (7.5)

A split EP from Whipstriker and Ice War is up next.

Brazil's Whipstriker have 3 songs clocking in at 10 minutes. This one man band effort is the brainchild of Viictor "Whipstriker" Vasconcellos. It is thrash with guttural vocals that kicks butt from the start. A highlight is "Rot in Trench" which sounds a bit like classic Venom. The production is hardly pristine, but the songs are catchy and memorable, and that makes up for it. (7.5)

The other half of this split EP is dedicated to Canada's Ice War, one of the names used by one man band Jo Capitalicide. Dedicated readers of The Mighty Decibel will recall that this writer gave a strong endorsement to Ice War's recent album Defender, Destroyer, that being a straight-up thrash album. This EP is something very different, sounding like first generation punk on amphetamines. To these ears this sounds like Dead Kennedys, with vocals like Jello Biafra, but faster than what was produced in early 80s punk. Jo Capitalicide is one versatile guy, that is for sure. This strikes the listener as being awkward at first, but it is a grower. (8)